Tuesday, August 11, 2020

A Dumb Musician’s Guide to Self-Releasing Music | Hypebot

A Dumb Musician’s Guide to Self-Releasing Music

Tony Guerrero joins co-host Michael Brandvold and Jay Gilbert of he Music Biz Weekly podcast this week to discuss his free ebook The Dumb Musician’s Guide to Self-Releasing Music in the Digital Age.

All you need to know to release your music online and be sure you’re protected and earning everything you can. It explains Copyrights, Publishing, ISRC Codes, UPC Codes, SoundExchange, ASCAP/BMI, Digital Distributers and more.

Download The Dumb Musician’s Guide to Self-Releasing Music in the Digital Age for free at: https://bit.ly/musiciansguide

Bruce Houghton on 08/11/2020 in

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Skrillex agent Simon Clarkson joins ICM Partners | Music Business Worldwide

Los Angeles-born ICM Partners has hired highly respected music agent Simon Clarkson.

He brings with him several clients including EDM superstar Skrillex, Alison Wonderland, Aluna George and San Holo.

His appointment follows the news in March that ICM Partners – whose touring roster includes the likes of Khalid, Migos, and Sinead O’Connor – acquired London-based music agency Primary Talent International, which counts the likes of Daft Punk, Dave and Stormzy amongst its list of clients.

The news of Clarkson’s appointment was announced today (August 11) by Rob Prinz, Worldwide Head of Concerts at ICM Partners and Matt Bates, Head of International at PTI/ICM.

Clarkson, who will be based in Los Angeles, starts immediately and will head up the agency’s domestic Electronic Music Department (EMD).

Clarkson has spent the past eight years at WME and prior to that ran Mainstage Artists.

He has also played a key role in developing acts as Skrillex, Calvin Harris, Kygo, Eric Prydz, Adam Beyer and Above & Beyond.

“Very excited to join the team at ICM and Primary to fortify and bolster the Electronic Music Department, a genre we all believe we can continue to grow significantly over the years.”

Simon Clarkson

“Very excited to join the team at ICM and Primary to fortify and bolster the Electronic Music Department, a genre we all believe we can continue to grow significantly over the years,” said Simon Clarkson.

“We are thrilled to have Simon join the agency to help us build out a domestic Electronic Music Department, an area we’ve long wanted to expand in.”

Rob Prinz, ICM

Added Prinz: “We are thrilled to have Simon join the agency to help us build out a domestic Electronic Music Department, an area we’ve long wanted to expand in.

“His talent and experience are a perfect fit for us.”

“Simon is highly respected within our industry, has tremendous clients, relationships, and expertise that perfectly complement our strengths and we could not be happier to have him join the ICM/Primary family.”

Matt Bates, PTI/ICM

Matt Bates, Head of International at PTI/ICM, said: “Simon is highly respected within our industry, has tremendous clients, relationships, and expertise that perfectly complement our strengths and we could not be happier to have him join the ICM/Primary family.”

 Music Business Worldwide

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Justin Seltzer promoted to General Manager of Blue Note Records | Music Business Worldwide

Justin Seltzer has been promoted to the newly-created position of General Manager of Blue Note Records.

The news was announced today (August 11) by Blue Note President Don Was, to whom Seltzer reports.

Seltzer is charged with managing the day-to-day operations of Blue Note, under the auspices of Was, executing the label’s business strategy and playing an instrumental role in artist signings, creating and executing marketing campaigns for label artists and projects, and directing commercial aspects of Blue Note releases in the US and around the world.

Seltzer is based in Hollywood within the iconic Capitol Tower.

Prior to being promoted to General Manager, Seltzer served as Vice President of Blue Note, having joined the company in 2014 as a Director to work in A&R, marketing and general label operations.

He has played an integral role in campaigns for Blue Note artists such as Wayne Shorter, Robert Glasper, Trombone Shorty, Gregory Porter, Kandace Springs and others, as well as the development and launch of Blue Note Review, a limited-edition subscription box set.

He is also leading the development of and strategy behind Blue Note’s eCommerce store.

Seltzer was instrumental in Blue Note’s 80th Anniversary Campaign that began in 2019 and included the launch of the Tone Poet Audiophile Vinyl Reissue Series, the 25-city 80th Anniversary Tour that featured Blue Note artists Kandace Springs, James Carter and James Francies, and the Limited Edition Watch collaboration with G-Shock.

He is key to the success of the annual Blue Note at Sea cruise that has sold out in each of its four years, as well as the curation of the annual Blue Note at Sea tent at the Monterey Jazz Festival.

Seltzer joined Capitol Music Group (CMG) in 2013 to build an A&R research team and worked with the portfolio of CMG labels to support their A&R teams to help identify important trends and potential artist signings.

He also supported CMG executives in various marketing, promotion and operational capacities.

Before joining CMG, Seltzer consulted for four years on the concept, development and execution of Rothbury Festival, now Electric Forest, a festival in Rothbury, Michigan that featured Dave Matthews Band, Bob Dylan and The Dead, among others.

He was a Business Development executive for digital marketing firm ePrize (now HelloWorld) from 2007 through 2012, working with clients such as Live Nation, Nike and Microsoft.

“Justin is a passionate advocate for jazz and is innovative in his approach to expanding the jazz audience in our ever-evolving industry.”

Don Was 

Don Was said: “Justin is a passionate advocate for jazz and is innovative in his approach to expanding the jazz audience in our ever-evolving industry.

“He has done a tremendous job over the past six years, and this Is a well-deserved promotion.”

“It’s one of the greatest honors of my life to help carry the torch at such an iconic label like Blue Note Records. I look forward to continuing to build on Blue Note’s 80-year legacy with my mentor and our leader, Don Was.”

Justin Seltzer

Justin Seltzer added: “It’s one of the greatest honors of my life to help carry the torch at such an iconic label like Blue Note Records. I look forward to continuing to build on Blue Note’s 80-year legacy with my mentor and our leader, Don Was.

“I want to thank Don for his incredible vision, creativity and inclusiveness, as well as the whole Blue Note family; I’m constantly inspired by them and love being a part of this team.

“I would also like to thank Steve Barnett, Michelle Jubelirer and Geoff Harris for their incredible support and confidence in me.”Music Business Worldwide

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Sony/ATV signs worldwide deal with songwriter & artist Jozzy | Music Business Worldwide

Sony/ATV Music Publishing has signed a worldwide publishing administration agreement with Grammy award-winning songwriter and recording artist Jozzy.

Jocelyn Donald, better known as Jozzy has collaborated with talent such as Beyoncé, Pharrell Williams, Timbaland, Missy Elliot, Usher, Summer Walker, Lil Wayne, Coldplay, Ella Mai, 21 Savage, and many more.

Among her most notable work was writing Billy Ray Cyrus’s verse on Lil Nas X’s Old Town Road Remix.

The track spent 19 weeks at No.1, gained a Grammy nomination for Record of The Year, and won a Grammy for Best Pop Duo/Group Performance.

In addition to her achievements as a songwriter, Jozzy is also now focusing on her career as an artist and recently signed with Columbia records.

Her debut track as an artist was the hypnotic Sucka Free, featuring Lil Wayne, a longtime collaborator and friend.

Jozzy is currently at work on a forthcoming EP called Soul Therapy: Apartment 215, and released singles including Let You Down Let You Go and I’m Gone featuring Tommy Genesis.

“We are pleased to welcome her to Sony/ATV, and I am confident we will earn major success as a creative team.”

Jon Platt

Sony/ATV Chairman and CEO Jon Platt, said: “Jozzy is an incredibly accomplished songwriter with once in a generation talent.

“We are pleased to welcome her to Sony/ATV, and I am confident we will earn major success as a creative team.”

“I’m thrilled to be working with Jon Platt and Sony/ATV.”

Jozzy 

Jozzy added: “I’m thrilled to be working with Jon Platt and Sony/ATV.

“There’s no doubt we’ll do great things together. The best is yet to come!”

 Music Business Worldwide

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Stay On Top Of New Music Industry News With Hypebot’s RSS Feed | Hypebot

Stay On Top Of New Music Industry News With Hypebot’s RSS Feed

One of the best ways to follow Hypebot is via our RSS feed using Feedly or your favorite RSS reader.

It’s a great way to stay up to date with all of our daily posts.

Use it. Share it. Spread the word.

Bruce Houghton on 08/11/2020 in

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New Data Shows Music Videos Continue To Dominate YouTube | Hypebot

New Data Shows Music Videos Continue To Dominate YouTube

Although categories like Gaming have seen impressive growth over the past few years, YouTube’s most popular content where consumers are concerned continues to be music videos.

Guest post by Bobby Owsinski of Music 3.0

While gaming may be huge, it still has a way to go when it comes to overtaking music videos in terms of YouTube consumption, according to the latest data from the analysis group Pex. Music’s 2,944 views per video minute was more than twice of the nearest category (Entertainment) and more than 22 times that of gaming.

When it comes to the number of videos on the platform, gaming leads with 37% as compared to music’s 5% of videos. The total number of views is way different though, with music receiving 22% of all views as compared to only 8% of gaming. That means that even though there are more gaming videos on YouTube, fewer people watch them than music videos. This figure was up 2% from 2018.

That said, it’s harder to get views than ever before regardless of your category. 88.4% of all videos on the service receive less than 1,000 views. What’s worse, just 0.77% of all videos generated 83% of all the views!

Pex total YouTube views by tier image

For videos exceeding 1 billion views, Music is responsible for a whopping 83%. Entertainment manages only 1.5% of such videos, while Gaming comprises just 0.5%.

While these numbers might change now that Facebook can now play official music videos, YouTube continues to dominate when it comes to music according to the latest data.

The big problem is having your video gain traction, which is more difficult than ever. Even though music is the leading view driver on the platform, that doesn’t mean that it’s easy to break into that top 0.77%. It’s especially difficult these days to go viral on the service, although many artists can still have that happen via TikTok.

Despite the long odds, it’s still worth releasing a music video on YouTube as it’s more likely to be viewed there than almost anywhere else. It’s probably not a good idea to spend a lot of money on a big production however, since the payoff is unlikely.

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How To Find Time In Your Day To Create Music | Hypebot

How To Find Time In Your Day To Create Music

For so many artists, one of the most challenging things about creating music is actually finding the hours in a day to do it. Here we look at some key tips for restructuring your schedule to allow for more time spent on music.

Guest post by Hugh McIntyre of Soundfly’s Flypaper

One of the toughest things about making music is… actually finding the time to make music. We’ve been faced with plenty of articles about making music and being productive during quarantine, but how can artists develop habits during this time that stick once their schedules go back to normal?

(Plenty of artists remain part- and full-time essential workers when they’re not creating music — and we salute them!)

Many superstar musicians talk about spending days or weeks in the studio, and while that sounds glamorous (and rigorous, to those who have actually done it), it’s completely out of the question for those who haven’t topped the charts yet. Millions of artists have to pen every lyric and make sure every chord and melody is perfect before they pay for studio time, which they manage by holding down full-time day jobs or even part-time gigs.

Finding the time to make music (or for any passion pursuit, for that matter) is something that everybody struggles with, but it’s not impossible… though it does require some sacrifices.

If you’re having a hard time carving out some hours (or even just a couple of minutes here and there) — even during quarantine — to work on your art, here are a few suggestions that have worked for me in the past when I needed more time for what really mattered most to me.

+ Read more on Flypaper: “How to Be a Parent While Also Being a Musician.”

Social Media

We all love social media, and as a musician, it’s actually something that’s very important to your career. But that doesn’t give you a license to spend all your time on it. Sites like Twitter and Instagram can be addictive, and they are crafted to keep people’s eyeballs on them as long as possible, but you can break away and stop scrolling.

I personally have an app called StayFocusd, which helps me do just that. I can make it block all social sites for a period of time, or only allow me a certain number of minutes or app opens per day. There are countless programs like that, all created with the idea that we are now too addicted to social platforms and we may need some help limiting our screen time, which bit by bit sucks our days away.

TV

Like social media, TV is something that is created specifically to keep us tuning in. We have to find out what happens at the end of the episode, and companies like Netflix encourage us to binge-watch. Quarantine has obviously contributed to an increase in this behavior. How is one to stop watching when there is so much great content out there?

Simply put, just don’t begin. Your friends may be texting you about that hilarious new show, or a movie they thought was touching, and while I’m sure they’re right (they’re probably not), you can decide that you have more important things in your life to spend your time on. While we’re stuck inside and entertainment can feel limited, it is possible to make watching TV or movies a rare treat, as opposed to the norm.

Get Up Earlier

We all hate this idea, but it’s one that really works. Instead of going to bed late and rising even later, try shifting your schedule. Get under the covers at a reasonable time and set several alarms for the morning. You may want to make this a gradual process, shifting the time you rise earlier and earlier by increments.

Also, you may learn to perform well on seven hours of sleep instead of eight or more. I’m not going to sit here and tell you to deprive your body of the rest it needs, but you can make cuts and alterations that will allow you to gain back time that can be used to write, record, and play.

Meal Prep

This is something I suggest to people whether they are looking to save time or not, since it’s actually a very helpful process. During these times, it’s likely something that more and more people have begun to focus on as a necessity.

Take one evening every week and set it aside to cook. Make whatever meals you’re going to need for the coming seven days (or fewer, if necessary) and prep them all at once, storing them in your fridge for later. This way, you have cheap, healthy, tasty meals ready at any time of day or night. You might be surprised how much time you spend every day (not to mention money if you’re often ordering) preparing food to eat!

Turn Everything Off

When you’ve found the time to write, learn your instrument, record, and so on, make sure you only use it for those purposes. Don’t do all this work just to waste your valuable time on your phone, watching YouTube videos, or texting with friends.

Turn everything off, don’t look at your mobile device, don’t go on the internet, and set a goal for that session. It may be simply to organize lyrics or play around with sounds, but knowing what you want to do and actually accomplishing it is huge. If you’re not careful, all that extra time can end up being wasted in ways you’d never imagined.

Owen Davie on 08/11/2020 in

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