Wednesday, February 28, 2018

How To Write An E-mail Pitch That Gets Your Music Heard | Music Think Tank

To make traction in music, you’ll have to get your music into the hands of gatekeepers in the industry. Ideally, you’ll have a formal introduction to the people who hold positions of power in the business, but what’s most likely is that you will have to send cold e-mails to people you don’t know in hopes that they will respond favorably. Here are the five key elements you should include to make your pitch e-mails stand out from the rest.

The Introduction

This part is simple. You should open your e-mail by letting the person know who you are, and what you do that would be relevant to them. Ex: “Hi! I’m Scott, the lead singer of Trial By Fire. We’re a soft-rock band influenced by acts like The Doors and Pink Floyd.” Including similar artists helps your prospect understand whether or not you would be a good fit for their platform.

How You Found Them

Immediately after your introduction, you should tell the prospect how you found out about them. For even better results, you should include a specific, detailed compliment about their work. This helps to build goodwill and shows that you’re interested in them as a person. You don’t want to be seen as a freeloader who cares only about yourself. Take time to learn about the work of the people in positions of power. Don’t lie just to score points. It’s easy to tell the difference.

The Ask

Tell the prospect why you’re reaching out to them. Do you have a new single you’d like them to consider for a blog post or playlist placement? Say exactly that. Be short, sweet, and direct. Saying something vague like “Listen to our song and tell us what you think” might get you feedback, but it won’t automatically get you considered for Spotify’s “Cool Tracks” playlist. Always ask for what you want. If the answer is no, make it clear that you’d like any constructive criticism they have to offer. Any response is better than nothing.

Relevant Information/Links

If you want someone to spend their valuable time to help you, you have to make it easy for them to do so. Include links to the song you want considered as well as your website, social media or press kit. This will ensure your prospect has all the information they need to make a decision on whether or not to grant your request.

Important: Instead of an mp3 attachment, include a link to a private stream of your song. Mp3 attachments bog down the recipient’s e-mail server and are a huge turnoff to the gatekeepers in the music industry.


Always close your e-mail by thanking the prospect. They took time out of their busy day to read your pitch, and even listen to your music. Being sure to show your gratitude will cement you as a professional in the mind of the prospect and make them feel good about taking the time to read your pitch.

If you include all five of these key elements in your pitch, and your music is good enough, you stand a great chance to win over the mind of any blogger, DJ or other Music Industry influencer. Still nervous about crafting the e-mail? I’ve included a free download of our Perfect E-mail Pitch Template. Download it, paste it into your e-mail client and fill in the blanks. You’ll be well on your way to getting your music heard by the people who can help propel your career forward.

Brandon Jackson  is an artist manager, consultant, and author of the Music Marketing Guidebook. For more music business advice, follow him on YouTubeFacebook or subscribe via e-mail.

How To Write An E-mail Pitch That Gets Your Music Heard


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